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2019 NHPCA Annual Conference Sessions
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Tuesday, March 12

 

8:15 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.

Concurrent Sessions

 

Raising the Bar with Your Hospice QAPI Program

Lynn Stange, RN, BSN, MA, CHC, Principal/President, Weatherbee Resources, Headland, Alabama

 

This session is designed to assist hospices with elevating their current Quality Assessment Performance Improvement (QAPI) programs by changing the focus from data reporting to achieving sustained quality results.

 

Objectives:

This training will allow participants to describe the key components of a (QAPI) program, use the QAPI process to create a culture of quality, engage staff in the QAPI process in a meaningful way, and review data and decision-making regarding improvement priorities.

                       

Tools for Success: Medicare Billing Updates and Reminders from CGS

Nykesha Scales, MBA, Senior Provider Relations Representative, CGS Administrators, Nashville, Tennessee

 

This session will ensure providers are aware of recent and upcoming Medicare billing changes, including an overview of current Change Requests (CRs). Updates relating to current denials and important reminders will also be provided. In addition, myCGS and the recent enhancements to this web portal will be highlighted. Common billing errors that prevent and delay payment as well as billing resources that are available to hospice and home health providers will be covered.

 

Objectives:

This training will allow participants to close gaps in provider knowledge of Medicare claims processing and reimbursement.

 

Guardianship and Power of Attorney

Mary Wilson, BA, JD, Attorney, Buford Law Office, Omaha, Nebraska

This session will describe laws concerning surrogate decision making. Discussion will include rights and responsibilities of decision makers.

Objectives:
This training will allow participants to distinguish between a power of attorney, guardianship, and other surrogate decision procedures including the office of public guardian; and describe duties of surrogate decision makers.

 

Symptom Management of Nausea and Vomiting

Michelle Huber, RPH, PharmD, BCGP, Clinical Pharmacist, Hospice of Siouxland and Siouxland Pace, Sioux City, Iowa

 

The hospice clinical staff need to be experts in the understanding of nausea and vomiting to effectively manage and relieve patient suffering and improve quality of life. This session will dive into the body processes and receptors involved in nausea and vomiting. Understanding these processes will be key to improving the skill of symptom management by linking medication activity with probable cause in the body. Special situations where nausea is difficult to manage, such as bowel obstruction, pancreatic cancer, gastrointestinal cancers and others, will be discussed.  Ondansetron is not always the drug of choice.

 

Objectives:

This training will allow participants to understand the causes and central nervous system mechanisms involved in nausea and vomiting, learn how various medications are effective for nausea and vomiting in different disease states and conditions, and evaluate various situations for appropriate drug therapy treatment through case discussion.

 

 

9:45 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

General Session I

 

A View from Washington

Judi Lund Person, MPH, CHC, Vice President, Regulatory and Compliance, National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization

Participants will be able to understand the national environment as it relates to health care and hospice and palliative care specifically. This session will look at the congressional and regulatory activity and issues related to federally funded hospice care and look at the future of hospice and palliative care.


 

1:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions

 

Regulatory and National Perspective Overview

Judi Lund Person, MPH, CHC, Vice President, Regulatory and Compliance, National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization

New priorities and changes are constantly taking place in Washington. This session will take a look at how all of these changes will impact hospice and palliative care. Participants will learn what these changes mean for bills in Congress as well as new or changed regulations. This session will provide up-to-the-minute information on changes in Washington and their impact on hospice and palliative care providers.

 

Medicare News and Updates

Sandy Decker, RN, BSN, CGS, Nashville, Tennessee

This session will discuss recent information from the Centers for Medicare and Medicare Services (CMS) and CGS to keep providers up to date on hospice clinical information and practices. Participants will be encouraged to ask questions and discuss situations to put this information into practice. Intensive time will be devoted to documentation to lessen denials when submitting Additional Development Requests (ADRs).

 

Rural Community-Based Palliative Care

Sandy Kuhlman, Executive Director, Hospice Services of Northwest Kansas, Phillipsburg, Kansas

This session includes an overview of the National Consensus Project’s Clinical Practice Guidelines (Fourth Edition, published October 2018). Participants will examine community-based palliative care, including various types and models. The session will also discuss challenges and opportunities for community-based hospice care in rural areas.

Objectives:
Participants will be able to describe the eight domains of the National Consensus Project Clinical Practice Guidelines for Palliative Care (Fourth Edition), describe palliative care including various types and models, and identify challenges and opportunities for community-based palliative care in rural areas.

 

Veterans and Their Memories

Martin Thurber, Chaplain, Tabitha Hospice, Lincoln, Nebraska

 

One of the great traditions in the military is that no one gets left behind. It’s a sacred code that is lived by, even at the risk of one’s own life. The body is dead, but not left behind. What’s left is a sacred pool of memories that compels one to sprint or crawl back onto the battlefield and retrieve the body that created those memories. When we honor veterans today, we are carrying out this sacred memorial by honoring their memories, especially memories of service, God, country and family. The military checklist and the pinning ceremony are reminders that we leave no one behind. In this session, Martin Thurber will discuss how to use these two reminders to assist veterans with their memories and prepare them for a soldier’s death and lasting memorial for their family.

Objectives
This training will allow participants to self-report an increase in knowledge about veterans’ lives, self-report an increase in knowledge about how to help veterans and families recover and expand upon their memories, and self-report an increase in knowledge of tools to assist veterans with end-of-life issues surrounding their memories.

 


3:45 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

General Session II

 

National and State Trends in Palliative Care

Stacie Sinclair, MPP, LBSW, Senior Policy Manager, Center to Advance Palliative Care, New York City, New York

 

In the past several years, palliative care has grown significantly through policy initiatives and stakeholders’ independent contributions to the field. This presentation will discuss recent national- and state-level palliative care initiatives in the context of larger health care policy changes, identify opportunities to advance supportive palliative care in Nebraska, and provide resources to support these efforts.

 

Objectives:

This training will allow participants to describe current national and state palliative care opportunities and threats in the context of national health care trends, identify two to three state strategies to improve the availability of palliative care services, and identify national resources to support the provision of high-quality care for all Nebraskans with serious illness.



Wednesday, March 13

 

8:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.

Concurrent Sessions

 

Qualitative Analysis on End-of-Life Curriculum for Health Care Workers

Natalie von Oldenburg, Gerontology Certificate Student and Undergraduate Student in Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska – Lincoln; and Julie Masters, PhD, Professor and Chair, University of Nebraska Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska

 

This session will provide an overview of the current end-of-life communication content in health care education, including what is covered, how it impacts end-of-life conversations and patient care, and areas in need of improvement in order to meet the needs of the aging population.

 

Objectives:

This training will allow participants to explain the literature on end-of-life curriculum, formulate an effective approach for holding end-of-life conservations, and evaluate ways in which end-of-life curriculum can be improved.

 

Symptom Management of Nausea and Vomiting

Michelle Huber, RPH, PharmD, BCGP, Clinical Pharmacist, Hospice of Siouxland and Siouxland Pace, Sioux City, Iowa

 

The hospice clinical staff need to be experts in the understanding of nausea and vomiting to effectively manage and relieve patient suffering and improve quality of life. This session will dive into the body processes and receptors involved in nausea and vomiting. Understanding these processes will be key to improving the skill of symptom management by linking medication activity with probable cause in the body. Special situations where nausea is difficult to manage, such as bowel obstruction, pancreatic cancer, gastrointestinal cancers and others, will be discussed.  Ondansetron is not always the drug of choice.

 

Objectives:

This training will allow participants to understand the causes and central nervous system mechanisms involved in nausea and vomiting, learn how various medications are effective for nausea and vomiting in different disease states and conditions, and evaluate various situations for appropriate drug therapy treatment through case discussion.

 

Hospice PEPPER: Demystifying the Data to Mitigate Payment-Related Risk

Carrie Cooley, Weatherbee Resources, Headland, Alabama

The hospice industry is facing unprecedented payment-related scrutiny, and providers are desperate to identify risk factors that might place a hospice in the cross hairs of a CMS or other government audit. When fully understood and utilized, the Hospice Program for Evaluating Payment Patterns Electronic Report (PEPPER Report) allows providers to identify potentially problematic trends and/or billing patterns and implement a plan of self-correction to mitigate current or future payment-related scrutiny. This session will demystify the PEPPER Report and explain how a provider can use the data within to result in meaningful risk mitigation.

Objectives:
This training will allow participants to recall the difference between percent and percentile as it relates to the Hospice PEPPER, list a minimum of five PEPPER Target Areas and explain the significance of a PEPPER Target Area being at or above the 80th percentile, and demonstrate competence in using PEPPER Target Areas to determine organizational risk according to the hospice’s percentile ranking for each Target Area.

 

Meditation and Relaxation Techniques to Reduce Suffering and Facilitate Growth

Heather Stang


Meditation can be practiced in many forms, from guided imagery to mindfulness to compassion and loving kindness. Each has a special place in the hospice and palliative care setting, and can empower patients, families and professional caregivers to skillfully tend to physical and emotional suffering, deepen interpersonal connections, build resilience, and explore themes of forgiveness, gratitude, meaning and love. Participants will learn how to choose situation-appropriate techniques for both end-of-life care and bereavement while exploring ways to apply the practices to their own life so they can authentically share them with the people they serve.

Objectives:
This training will allow participants to summarize the research and philosophies that support meditation as an effective intervention in the hospice and palliative care setting, differentiate three types of meditation practices and their specific applications, and discuss a trauma-sensitive approach for facilitating meditation-based interventions during end-of-life care and grief.

 

11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

General Session III

 

I Am Not Afraid to Die

Amy Dix, Author, Speaker, Co-Founder, The Positive Life Company, Jacksonville, Florida

 

This motivational session will inspire you to live life on a different level, rooted in positivity and pure happiness. Amy will take you on an emotional journey of pain, perseverance and positivity, and will reveal the science behind happiness. Humans are pre-determined to be more negative than positive. This session will discuss the research behind The Negativity Bias.

 

Objectives:

This training will allow participants to learn how genes affect positivity and how the world is viewed; learn how brains work and which parts of the brain affect happiness; explore how they can change the make-up of their brains in order to lead to greater happiness; explore three pillars – character, connections and community – that affect happiness that must be mastered; and explore practical actions everyone can do to affect change.

 

1:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions

 

Telehospice: The Project Plan and the Stories

Adam Lomenick, BS, Research Coordinator, Westwood, Kansas; and Sandy Kuhlman, Executive Director, Hospice Services of Northwest Kansas, Phillipsburg, Kansas

 

This workshop will review and share objectives, improvements and challenges faced during the implementation of the Telehospice Quality Project.

 

Objectives:

This training will allow participants to describe telehealth and current uses, including the technology, benefits and challenges; identify goals and objectives of the Telehospice Quality Project; and use telehospice stories to consider and create innovative approaches to improve access to quality care.

 

Trisomy 18: Healing Hearts, Changing Minds

Dr. Andrew Macfadyen, MD, Medical Director, Children’s Hospital and Medical Center Hand-in-Hand Palliative Care, Omaha; and Terra Garst, MSN, RN, CLC, Nebraska State Chapter Chair, Support Organization for Trisomy 18, 13, and Related Disorders (SOFT)

 

There are many misconceptions surrounding the outcomes and appropriate therapies for patients with trisomy 18. These misconceptions are deeply ingrained in the medical community and should be re-evaluated in light of new data and advances in medical practice.

 

Objectives:

This training will allow participants to identify improvements in the medical outcomes of patients with trisomy 18; state the ethical arguments pertinent to patients with trisomy 18; impart accurate medical information to mothers who are expecting children who have trisomy 18; self-report an increase in knowledge about trisomy 18; integrate new knowledge in their hospice and palliative care practice including prenatal counseling; and state the ethics arguments in favor of actively treating patients with trisomy 18.

 

The Good Life at the End of Life – Giving Life Meaning

Richard Bristol, Tabitha Hospice, Lincoln, Nebraska

 

Spiritual care and health is just as important as physical care and health. This session will highlight the benefits of spiritual support while identifying barriers of spiritual support and how best to collaborate care.

Objectives:
This training will allow participants to explain the benefits of spiritual support from medical personnel in patient care, list the three main categories of spiritual care, and explain the major barriers to good spiritual care and collaboration.

 

Medical Marijuana: What We Know, What We Don’t

Ally Dering-Anderson, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska

 

This session will review the unknowns about medical cannabinoids (marijuana). Factual information will be provided so that you may make a determination about what is best for your setting and situation. Insights will be provided on the legal ramifications of this product’s use in Nebraska.

Objectives:
This training will allow participants to define medical cannabis using the AACP standard definition, cite claimed and verified medical uses for cannabinoids, discuss administration of cannabinoids, and formulate policy opinions of medical cannabinoids.

 

2:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.

General Session IV

 

Community-Based Palliative Care – Expanding Opportunities

Anne Monroe, Bluegrass Care Navigators, Lexington, Kentucky


Community-based palliative care offers hospices the opportunity to expand their expertise and services. Participants will learn the key principles for establishing a community-based palliative service. In addition, the structure and operations of an established program will be highlighted, including lessons learned and tips for success. The session will include models, eligibility, partners and finances. Practical next steps for enhancing or starting a community-based palliative care program will be provided.

Objectives:
This training will allow participants to recognize the motivation and need for community-based palliative care, explain the key principles for providing community-based palliative care, explain the structure and operations of community-based palliative care at Bluegrass Care Navigators, and outline next steps for community-based palliative care in their communities.

 

4:00 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.

General Session V

 

A Piece of the Puzzle – 8 Traits of a Quality Teammate

Kevin Kush, Owner, Kevin Kush Public Speaking, La Vista, Nebraska

 

How well do the members of your team or organization work together? Are you a smooth, well-oiled machine or a fractured collection of in-it-for-yourself individuals? In a straight-forward, no-excuses style, author and coach Kevin Kush outlines eight traits that can turn any group or organization into a cohesive, high performing team.

 

Objectives:

This training will allow participants to define the eight traits of a quality teammate, develop an understanding of the relationship of individual behavior to team success, and make a commitment to become a better teammate.


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