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About Hospice and Palliative Care - Definition of Palliative Care
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Definition of Palliative Care


Sometimes referred to as “comfort care,” palliative care is a specialized approach to the treatment of patients with a serious or life-threatening illness. The goal of palliative care is to provide relief from the symptoms, pain and stress of serious illness. It is also designed to improve the quality of life of both the patient and the patient’s family.

Palliative care is provided by a team of specialists who are trained in assisting patients and their families through what can be the most difficult time in their lives. Members of the team typically include physicians, nurse practitioners, social workers, and spiritual care coordinators. Some palliative care teams have physical and speech therapists, pharmacists, dieticians and trained volunteers. SOURCE: NHPCO

Palliative care is specialized medical care for people with serious illness. This type of care is focused on providing relief from the symptoms and stress of a serious illness. The goal is to improve quality of life for both the patient and the family. Palliative care is provided by a specially-trained team of doctors, nurses and other specialists who work together with a patient’s other doctors to provide an extra layer of support. It is appropriate at any age and at any stage in a serious illness, and it can be provided along with curative treatment. SOURCE: Center to Advance Palliative Care